Call for Poetry Submissions: 100-Word Southwest Poems

Submissions Window: March 21–July 4, 2017

FOR ALL SUBMISSIONS:

  • Do not put your name or any other identifying information on the document that holds the poems you submit. Do not include your name in the file name of the document you submit.We follow a "blind" reading system: our editors read all poetry submissions without knowing who wrote the poems. 
  • Use Times New Roman 12 pt. for the text of your submission. Single space your poems; double space between stanzas.
  • Place all poems for one submission in a single document—one poem per page. We accept .doc, .docx, and .rtf files.
  • We welcome the expression of diverse voices, diverse cultures—including poems partly or entirely in Spanish. Please include an English translation of a poem written in a language other than English.
  • No previously published work. We consider a poem published if it has appeared online or in print, including personal blogs/webpages or social media sites.
  • No simultaneous submissions.
  • No submissions by e-mail or regular mail.
Ends on July 4, 2017

Editors Scott Wiggerman and David Meischen are accepting submissions for the third book in the “Poetry of the American Southwest” series. This one has two requirements: 1) poems that demonstrate a connection to persons, places, geography, flora/fauna, and/or culture of the American Southwest, and 2) the poem must be exactly 100 words, no more, no less. Poetry is a language of precision, and the constriction of 100 words will put your mastery of language to the test. A variety of styles and topics is encouraged, including prose poems, haiku sequences, and haibun. Start counting, poets!

Submissions Window: March 21–July 4, 2017.

Tips for Counting:

  • Titles do not count as part of the 100 words. Note that we strongly prefer titled poems, except for haiku.
  • No epigraphs, please. We want the focus of each poem to be the 100 words of the poem itself.
  • Hyphenated words count as one word (e.g. risk-averse, twenty-seven). Check dictionaries, style guides, and authorities for your hyphenations.
  • Numerals (e.g., 100) count as one word, unless spelled out (e.g., one hundred). A year (e.g., 1967) counts as a single word (November 23, 1943 = three words).
  • Un-spaced, capitalized abbreviations and initialisms (e.g., USA, OSHA, CIA) count as a single word.
  • Un-spaced initials (e.g. U.S.) count as a single word.
  • Two words with an un-spaced slash mark between them count as one word (e.g., flora/fauna).
  • In Word, the easiest way to track your word count is to highlight the poem, look at the lower left-hand corner, and you’ll see the count.
  • Please contact editors@dosgatospress.org for other counting questions as they arise.

Guidelines for 100-Word Southwest Poems:

  • Submit 1-3 original, unpublished poems.
  • Follow Guidelines for All Submissions—above.
  • Include a 60-word bio written in third person with your submission, focused on your writing life.
  • Our broad definition of “Southwest” includes the following states or portions of states: Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma.
  • Acceptance for publication conveys First North American Serial Rights, first-print publication rights, and the right to post work accepted for publication on the Dos Gatos Press website. Rights revert to the author upon publication. Payment is one contributor’s copy of the anthology.